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Lexington Of Orland Park

  1. Skilled Nursing Home Facilities
  2. Illinois
  3. Orland Park Skilled Nursing Home Facilities
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Reviews
Overall Rating 2.1 / 5.0 ★★★★★

  • Toni Bria
    ★★★★★ a month ago

    If you are going to this facility and have prescription medication or any health issues, do not go. My mom went for physical therapy and they stopped giving her some of her medications which caused her to become very ill. Aids and therapist kept my mom clean and were very gentle with her, but the nurses were rude and understaffed. We were told twice "I'm busy" from a nurse. Two higher up staff members told me confidentially to get my mom out of there. She became so ill that we called an ambulance. The nurses speak to the director of nursing in a very disrespectful to him , in front of family member. When my concerns were brought to Joseph's attention, who is the director of nursing, there were answers after researching but the answers always showed error on the nursing staff and or miscommunication. He has no follow-up or follow through with his staff. This happened multiple times. It takes 20 to 30 minutes for someone to reply to a nurse call. I feel sorry for people that are patients there that do not get regular visitors. Who knows what they are doing with their medicine! You have been warned. Do not use this facility.

  • NeneJLM M
    ★★★★★ 2 months ago

    If you love your family member do not send them here! My father was supposed to come here for PT. Instead they gave him a medication that made him sleepy all the time and he could never participate in PT and they never gave him any water. The result, he's now back in the hospital with acute renal failure and a DVT. If you care one ounce about your loved one, DO NOT SEND THEM HERE!

  • Veronica Tarala
    ★★★★★ a month ago

    My father was a patient at Lexington Healthcare of Orland Park. He was there for 2 weeks. He will never come back to this facility. I recommend that you do not make the same mistake by having your loved ones be under this facility were things look great in the lobby and on paper. At the 2 week mark my father developed shortness of breath, chest pain, was sweating, was anxious,feeling that death was nearing, heart rate was 120-140, blood pressure in the 80's systolic, oxygen saturation, mid 80's. All these symptoms started at about 4:30 pm on a Friday, May 1, 2015. My mother arrived there and refused to contact me to tell me about the changes. She said the nurse was notified. And she trusted that something was going to be done. Vitals were taken, noted the saturation was low but did not place my father on oxygen. I called at 6 pm spoke to the nurse and informed me that all the symptoms were communicated to the doctor and that everything was being done according to the doctors orders. I went to the facility because I didn't trust the nurse, she sounded angry and inconvenienced. When I showed up, my father was still struggling, the nurse refused to talk to me. I called the facility (while in my dads room) and asked to be connected to the doctor, when she answered she said hat nurse assured her my dads vitals signs had improved, NO VITALS WERE DONE, at least from 6:30 on, NEVER GOT BETTER, someone was lying. I stated the facts to the doctor. Current vitals signs taken by me and since an electrocardiograph was being performed when I arrived, I saw the results myself, sinus tachycardia in the 140s with a left bundle brunch block, respiratory rate 38, shallow breathing. I said to the nurse to please call 911 or I would. She looked at me with a deadly look and said, as she was wiping her hands... "If you call 911, your dad's situation will be off our hands and you will be responsible for what happens next." 911 was eventually called, the medics and the new nurse argued in my dad's room as to why they did not called earlier. My father asked me to not called 911 (when I first arrived) because he was afraid to get billed by Lexington and then the ER visit if we left against what the nurse had advised. My father made it to Palos Heights hospital and was hospitalized for 13 days, from ER he went to intensive care unit, diagnosed in the ER with sepsis, non stemi heart attack, and after a CT of chest with bilateral pulmonary embolism, for which eventually during that hospitalization had to have a filter and is still on anticoagulantion therapy. It took my father five and a half months to make it back home after his initial surgery. I understand that patients who have limited mobility have the potential for complications such as pulmonary embolisms, what is frightening is the inability of the clinicians in charge to recognize and report abnormal symptoms. What took so long? Even when there is a language barrier, look at the patient objectively-vital signs, skin color, struggle to breath, inability to speak in full sentences. What is wrong with our clinicians and this healthcare system? How can these facilities exist and are continually accredited even though they are so deficient? Why is care different in the evening, the weekends? Update after almost 4 years My father is still alive after 4+ years. I am still scared from this horrible experience. My father has not been hospitalized but one time in the last three years, only when absolutely necessary. I truly believe that patients should be cared at home. Is too bad many patients do not have families who support such care.

  • Erika Byrd
    ★★★★★ 6 months ago

    My mother was in excellent hands the staff is compassionate and hard working. This facility accommodates the family as a whole and I recommend this facility to anyone who wants quality over quantity, they need more workers on the 3rd floor the staff has asked that we as family or friends to help with hiring more workers the facility is awesome.

  • Brittany Gregory
    ★★★★★ 5 months ago

    Let me start out by saying, I also work in the health care field and know how hard it is to deal with high maintenance families at times.. Especially large high maintenance families. The entire staff at Lexington in Orland Park handled my concerns/questions and my families with patience and a true sincerity. My 93-year-old grandma spent 2 weeks in the hospital and required skilled nursing care before she could return home. There really are not words to express how thankful I am for Jospeh, the Director of Nursing, Nikkie, the Administrator, Tubor, the Memory Care Manager, and the entire nursing staff including Dominique and Sheria. They made my grandma and my entire family feel at home and cared for. From the very first day, staff (including department heads) came to personally introduce themselves to my grandma and whoever else was there visiting at the time. They genuinely took an interest in making sure her stay there was welcoming and comfortable. My grandma's favorite part was physical therapy. She could not wait to do it every day and was excited to tell us about the progress she made! She would even try and get us to come watch her during physical therapy. The facility is very clean and nicely decorated. The house keeping staff were amazing as well. Kept my grandmas room and bathroom very clean. I would definitely recommend this skilled nursing facility!

About Lexington Of Orland Park

General Information

Legal Business NameLexington Health Care Center Of Orland Park Inc
Ownership TypeFor Profit - Individual
Changed Ownership In The Last 12 MonthsNo
First Accepted MedicareAugust 23, 1996 (23 years)
Capacity259
Residents182
Percent Occupied70%
Program ParticipationMedicare And Medicaid
Resident And Family CouncilsResident
In HospitalNo
Continuing Care Retirement CommunityNo
Special Focus FacilityNo
Auto Sprinkler System In Required AreasYes

Ratings for Lexington Of Orland Park

Lexington Of Orland Park was reviewed by Medicare to have a rating of 3 out of 5 stars.

About Medicare Ratings
Overall Rating
Health Inspections Rating
Quality Measures Rating
Staff Rating
RN Staff Rating

Overall Ratings of Illinois Nursing Homes

Fines, Complaints, and Inspection Problems in the Past 3 Years

Compare The Number of Problems

Types of Problems at Nursing Homes

Some issues within a nursing home are much more severe than others. Medicare evaluates each problem based on 2 scales: the number of residents affected by a problem and the severity of the potential or actual harm to residents based on the problem. We have color coded the matrix below to make it easier to pick out the more severe problems. In general, orange and red issues related to the treatment of a resident are considered substandard quality of care.

  Residents Affected
Severity of the Deficiency Few Some Many
Immediate jeopardy to resident health or safety J K L
Actual harm that is not immediate jeopardy G H I
No actual harm with potential for more than minimal harm that is not immediate jeopardy D E F
No actual harm with potential for minimal harm A B C

October 18, 2017 - 2 years ago

 Residents AffectedSeveritySource/TypeDescription
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintEnsure that each resident's 1) entire drug/medication regimen is free from unnecessary drugs; and 2) is managed and monitored to achieve highest level of well-being.
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintProvide necessary care and services to maintain or improve the highest well being of each resident .

June 9, 2017 - 2 years ago

 Residents AffectedSeveritySource/TypeDescription
GFewActual HarmHealth InspectionEnsure that a nursing home area is free from accident hazards and provide adequate supervision to prevent avoidable accidents.
DFewPotential for HarmHealth InspectionEnsure that each resident who enters the nursing home without a catheter is not given a catheter, unless medically necessary, and that incontinent patients receive proper services to prevent urinary tract infections and restore normal bladder functions.

February 8, 2017 - 2 years ago

 Residents AffectedSeveritySource/TypeDescription
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintEnsure that a nursing home area is free from accident hazards and provide adequate supervision to prevent avoidable accidents.

January 25, 2017 - 2 years ago

 Residents AffectedSeveritySource/TypeDescription
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintEnsure that each resident who enters the nursing home without a catheter is not given a catheter, unless medically necessary, and that incontinent patients receive proper services to prevent urinary tract infections and restore normal bladder functions.

December 27, 2016 - 2 years ago

 Residents AffectedSeveritySource/TypeDescription
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintEnsure that a nursing home area is free from accident hazards and provide adequate supervision to prevent avoidable accidents.

October 6, 2016 - 3 years ago

 Residents AffectedSeveritySource/TypeDescription
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintProvide necessary care and services to maintain or improve the highest well being of each resident .
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintEnsure services provided by the nursing facility meet professional standards of quality.

September 6, 2016 - 3 years ago

 Residents AffectedSeveritySource/TypeDescription
DFewPotential for HarmComplaintAssist those residents who need help with eating/drinking, grooming and personal and oral hygiene.

Staffing Levels Per Resident per Day

Medicare determines the expected staffing time per resident per day depending on level of care the residents of Lexington Of Orland Park require. It is important to compare the reported time to expected time for a single facility instead of comparing the amount of time per resident of two facilities. Learn why.

1hr 60min
2hr 40min
ReportedExpected
CNA
40min
45min
ReportedExpected
LPN
50min
1hr 15min
ReportedExpected
RN
3hr 25min
4hr 35min
ReportedExpected
Total Nursing

This facility also provides approximately 25min per resident per WEEK of physical therapist time.

Quality Measures for Long Stay Residents

78.0%
84.2%
84.2%
84.2%
92.8%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents assessed and appropriately given the seasonal influenza vaccine
66.5%
77.5%
95.1%
97.0%
91.3%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents assessed and appropriately given the pneumococcal vaccine
86.4%
83.7%
79.7%
87.0%
44.5%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of low risk long-stay residents who lose control of their bowels or bladder
27.3%
27.5%
23.9%
21.9%
21.6%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents who received an antianxiety or hypnotic medication
19.5%
10.4%
18.0%
17.0%
17.1%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents whose ability to move independently worsened
18.9%
20.8%
17.2%
20.0%
19.3%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents who received an antipsychotic medication
13.4%
18.1%
18.0%
20.3%
14.2%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents whose need for help with daily activities has increased
5.4%
7.6%
5.0%
3.6%
7.9%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents who lose too much weight
10.5%
8.2%
2.0%
3.8%
5.8%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of high risk long-stay residents with pressure ulcers
3.4%
1.6%
1.4%
0.9%
4.1%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents who self-report moderate to severe pain
0.7%
1.3%
4.8%
9.3%
18.8%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents who have depressive symptoms
3.0%
5.7%
4.3%
3.6%
3.7%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents with a urinary tract infection
4.1%
6.2%
4.3%
3.6%
3.4%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents experiencing one or more falls with major injury
3.0%
2.7%
1.1%
0.8%
2.2%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents with a catheter inserted and left in their bladder
1.8%
0.6%
0.0%
0.0%
0.4%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of long-stay residents who were physically restrained

Quality Measures for Short Stay Residents

56.1%
72.0%
75.4%
66.9%
76.0%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of short-stay residents assessed and appropriately given the pneumococcal vaccine
59.5%
69.5%
69.5%
69.5%
73.2%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of short-stay residents who were assessed and appropriately given the seasonal influenza vaccine
63.8%
66.7%
50.1%
54.0%
64.3%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of short-stay residents who made improvements in function
14.3%
9.6%
6.1%
7.3%
11.0%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of short-stay residents who self-report moderate to severe pain
3.4%
3.1%
5.7%
3.0%
2.2%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of short-stay residents who newly received an antipsychotic medication
2.7%
2.9%
2.4%
1.1%
1.1%
Q4 2016Q1 2017Q2 2017Q3 2017IL
Percentage of short-stay residents with pressure ulcers that are new or worsened



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